Grip

Illustrated Definitions


Gripping a club refers to the act of holding the club in your hands in preparation for a shot. It can also refer to a part of a golf club. In addition to the many different putter grips, there are three main ways a golfer can position his fingers in relation to each other on the grip of his clubs. There are also three ways – or strengths – that a golfer can position his fingers in relation to the grip of the club itself (neutral, weak, strong).


Interlock Grip

Interlock grip type in golfThe interlock grip is a type of finger placement that a golfer can use to hold a golf club in his hands. It is named as such because of the fact that the left index finger will hook into the right little finger, effectively locking – or interlocking – both hands together on the grip of the club.

Although not the most often used grip in golf it is nevertheless used by very notable golfers in Jack Nicklaus and Tiger Woods for example, amongst others.

More on: When to use an Interlocking grip


Vardon Grip | Overlap Grip

Overlap grip type in golfThe Vardon grip is a type of finger placement that a golfer can use to hold a golf club in his hands. Also known as the overlap grip the Vardon grip is named after the famous golfer Harry Vardon who helped popularize it early in the 20th century.

This grip is the one most used by golfers worldwide.

More on: When to use an Overlap grip


Baseball Grip | 10 Finger Grip

Baseball grip type in golfThe baseball – or 10 finger – grip is a type of finger placement that a golfer can use to hold a golf club in his hands. It is named as such because of its close resemblance to the grip used to grab a bat in baseball. A golfer with that grip will see all of his ten fingers neatly aligned on the grip, without any of them interlocking or overlapping, in contrast to the other types of grips.

More on: When to use a Baseball grip


Comparison of the various grip strengths (Strong, Neutral, Weak) in golf


Neutral grip

Neutral grip strength in golfA relative strength – in this case neutral – of the way fingers are positioned in order to hold a club. A golfer using a neutral grip will see the Vs formed by his thumbs pointing slightly to the right of his nose. Furthermore, a golfer using a neutral grip will see 2 knuckles on his left hand (top hand).

More on: Neutral grip and when to use it


Strong grip

Strong grip strength in golfA relative strength – in this case strong – of the way fingers are positioned on a golf club. A golfer using a strong grip will see the Vs formed by his thumbs pointing towards the trailing – right – shoulder. Furthermore, a golfer using a strong grip will see 3 knuckle on his left hand (top hand).

More on: When and why you should use a strong grip


Weak grip

Weak grip strength in golfA relative strength – in this case weak – of the way fingers are positioned on a golf club. A golfer using a weak grip will see the Vs formed by his thumbs pointing to the left shoulder. Furthermore, a golfer using a weak grip will see 1 knuckle on his left hand (top hand).

More on: When and why you should use a weak grip


Proper Golf Grip


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